The Pig: Bacon-wrapped Apples

The Pig's Bacon Wrapped Apples

We’re confident you have eaten many bacon-wrapped somethings in your time – scallops, filet, shrimp, dates … but we have a new one for you. Wrap your head around the perfect fall treat, The Pig’s Best Thing on the Menu: Bacon-wrapped Apples with Rosemary Honey, Buttermilk Blue Cheese and Pistachios. Sticky. Sweet. Smokey.

EatWell, the restaurant group also behind Commissary, Logan Tavern and more made a foray into creative, meat-loving cuisine with The Pig. It has turned out quite well, and we’re impressed by the frequent and seasonal updates to the menu. Sure, they’re pork-centric (and possibly pork-obsessed) but they’re anything but pork only. A testament to this is that the BTM runner up is their Grilled Octopus with Smoked Pork Sausage, Cherry Tomato, Potato, Squid Ink and Piquillo Pepper.

In the mood for a large plate? See the “Supper” section of the menu and don’t hesitate, even for a second, to get anything other than their amazing BBQ pork butt.

Another nod goes to The Pig for offering both wine on tap and a choice between glass and a glass-and-half pours.  Swine and wine, it turns out, are a great match. Check The Pig out this Halloween for their Zombie Apocalypse Halloween tasting menu.

Bacon-wrapped Apples not your BTM? Post your favorites in the comments section.

You might also like:  Green Pig Bistro or Garden District.

5 thoughts on “The Pig: Bacon-wrapped Apples

  1. Pingback: Petworth Citizen: Grilled Short Ribs | Best Thing on the Menu

  2. Pingback: DC’s Top Food and Drink Trends 2013 | Best Thing on the Menu

  3. Based solely on the awesome recs of BTM, we made sure to order the bacon wrapped apples tonight; however, I am still going to give my best bacon wrapped menu item to the long-serving bacon wrapped dates available at GW’s favorite dining hall, Founding Farmers. As for the best thing on the menu at The Pig, Cuban Porchetta.with cornmeal polenta wins it for me. Although cornmeal polenta is, to my mind, a bit redundant, like cruciform broccoli, I found the savory crispy & fork-tender porchetta nicely counterbalanced by the creamy smoothness of the Italian’s contribution to the world of grits.

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